Month: June 2016

New NRA Ad Attacks Clinton

By Admin

Well, the NRA (National Rifle Association) has thrown their support behind Donald Trump; and along with the organization’s support of the Trump campaign, they’re going to remind the American public of an event that happened not so long ago via a participant from that event.

In this short 30 second video, Mark Geist, United States Marine Corps. veteran, argues that former First Lady of the United States, U.S. Senator, and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton isn’t the right choice to be the next president of the United States because of her connection to this event. So why does Geist assert you should not vote for Hillary Clinton? Here’s his answer.

**Remember, there is nothing more American than discourse. You are always welcome to post your comments, thoughts, and questions below. 

Copyright ©2016 – The Systems Scientist

Whites not most employed, nationally

By Matt Johnson

Acccording to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, whites do not have the lowest unemployment rate, nationally. That honor belongs to Asian Americans. As the table below illustrates, they have had the lowest unemployment rate for the previous two first quarters.

Unemployment by race and ethnicityThe Systems Scientist did a little extra digging and found that Asian Americans have had the lowest unemployment rate of any racial group in the United States since at least 2007 with the exception of a short period in 2104 according to Thomson Reuters.

However, unemployment and race are usually presented as a duality; that is, black and white. In that case, black Americans were nearly or more than twice the unemployment rate of white Americans.

In 2015, the unemployment rate for blacks was 5.3 percentage points higher than whites during the first quarter of 2015. But that gap shrunk in 2016 to 4.4 percentage points. More importantly, the unemployment rate decreased from 10.4 in the first quarter of 2015 to 9.0 percent in the first quarter of 2016. Although black unemployment is still the highest nationally, it is at least heading in the right direction.

Finally, how does each group compare to the national average? The national unemployment rate for the first quarter 2015 was 5.8 percent, and the national unemployment rate for the first quarter 2016 was 5.2. As the table shows, Asians and whites were above the average in 2015 and 2016; whereas, Latinos (Hispanics) and blacks were below the average for 2015 and 2016.

Unemployment Rate
Race 2015 2016 Diff.
Asian 3.8 3.8 0
White 5.1 4.6 -0.5
Latino 7.3 6.1 -1.2
Black 10.4 9 -1.4
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

**Remember, there is nothing more American than discourse. You are always welcome to post your comments, thoughts, and questions below. 

Copyright ©2016 – The Systems Scientist

Bloomberg on China’s Economy

By Admin

Why might China’s economy be in trouble? It could be for a variety of reasons. Could it be the massive accumulated debt by both the public and private sectors in China? Could it be the population-less cities? Could it be the over saturated real estate market; that is, more properties than buyers? Could it be corruption? As the reader will see, that is just the start of the economic challenges that China is facing which doesn’t include demographic or environmental obstacles.

Will the Chinese attempt to change business as usual or will they remain stagnant? And what kind of policies will they utilize to facilitate economic change to increase the utility, economic vitality and happiness, of the citizenry? Here’s Bloomberg’s Quick Take.

Copyright ©2016 – The Systems Scientist

South Dakota Scores Lowest Unemployment Rate for May 2016

By Matt Johnson

The Bureau of Labor and Statistics recently released its unemployment rates for all 50 states plus the District of Columbia for the month of May. For the second month in a row, South Dakota, New Hampshire, and Nebraska retain their respective first, second, and third place positions.

What is the unemployment rate? Well it is the percent of those who do not participate in the work force. Mathematically, it is the labor force minus the number of employed, divided by the labor force, and multiplied by 100 percent. Or another way to look at how one can obtain the unemployment rate is by taking the number of unemployed, dividing that number by the labor force, and then multiplying that decimal number by 100 percent. Here’s a visual.

unemployment rate

What does this mean for South Dakota? This means that it has the lowest number of unemployed workers with respect to its total labor force. Why might this be? One reason might be the oil boom that has been happening now for past few years and the type of labor force that is demanded for such an industry. According to The Fiscal Times, workers in the industry range from drilling consultant to stimulation supervisor, while the annual salaries range from $238,697 to $101,703. In addition, many of the types of jobs require an engineering or science degree. In general, higher wages and educational level mean greater job stability.

Another reason might be the policies that are being implemented by the state governments. As the table illustrates, the governor of South Dakota is a republican (R); whereas, the governor of New Hampshire is a democrat (D). But three of the top five unemployment rates are in states with governors who are democrats. However, seven of the top ten governors are republicans. So is it industry or policies? Or is it a combination to the two? Those are questions for the reader to ponder.

 

May 2016 – Unemployment
Rank State Rate PA
1 South Dakota 2.5 R
2 New Hampshire 2.7 D
3 Nebraska 3 R
4 Vermont 3.1 D
5 Hawaii 3.2 D
5 North Dakota 3.2 R
7 Colorado 3.4 D
8 Maine 3.5 R
9 Idaho 3.7 R
9 Kansas 3.7 R
Source: Bureau of Labor and Statistics

 

**Remember, there is nothing more American than discourse. You are always welcome to post your comments, thoughts, and questions below. 

Copyright ©2016 – The Systems Scientist

How did NASA’s Kepler find the planet ‘HIP 116454b’ when it is 180 light years away?

By Robert Frost, Guest Columnist

This is one of the most famous pictures taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.  The features shown in it are called the Pillars of Creation.

These gaseous structures are part of the Eagle Nebula.  The Eagle Nebula is 7000 light years away.  The picture was taken by Hubble in 1995.  The Pillars of Creation are believed to have been destroyed by the blast wave of a nearby supernova, 6000 years ago.

We took a picture of something that was destroyed 6000 years before we took the picture.

That was possible because photography is passive.  We don’t send any type of wave or signal or beam towards the object we want to image.  It isn’t like radar where a radio wave is sent out, hits an object and bounces back towards us.  All we have to do with photography (or more precisely spectrography in this case) is open up our sensor and wait for photons to hit it.

The photons that we detected and allowed us to capture the image of the Pillars of Creation left the gaseous structure 7000 years ago.  They were already well on their way towards us a thousand years later when the structure was destroyed.

The same idea applies to the detection of exoplanets such as HIP 116454b.  We detect many of these exoplanets by observing changes in the light we are receiving from a star as the planet passes in front of the star.  That light left the star HIP 116454b orbits 180 years ago and finally just reached our camera sensors.  Those photons were coming towards us regardless of whether or not we wanted to capture them as a photograph.

Because all we are doing when we capture an image is capturing photons that traveled from the imaged object to us, we can take pictures of things that are incredibly far away.  In 2011, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope both captured pictures of a galaxy so far away that it took the photons 13.3 billion years to reach us.  This is a galaxy so old it existed just 400 million years after the Big Bang.

How did NASA’s Kepler find the planet ‘HIP 116454b’ when it is 180 light years away?

Shark Week 2016

By Matt Johnson

It’s that time of year again. It’s time to be an amateur marine biologist for one week. It’s time to watch Great Whites breach the surface of the ocean waters for yummy meals on seals off the southern coast of South Africa. It’s time to learn more about the habits and patterns of these mysterous rulers of the ocean.

It’s time to see how much technology has advanced and aided in helping scientists better understand all of the beautiful species of shark. It’s time to see how much Shark Week has helped in bringing about knowledge to the general public in hopes of better understanding and protecting these wonderous and important creatures.

The sharktivities begin Sunday, June 26th, at 8pm eastern daylight time (See the schedule below). And remember, if this year is like any other previous Shark Week year, Discovery will be showing reruns from previous Shark Week years throughout the day. Check your local service provider for show times.

Shark Week 2016 Schedule – All times are Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)

Sunday, June 26     

8:00 – 9:00 PM  – TIGER BEACH
9:00 – 10:00 PM – RETURN OF THE MONSTER MAKO
10:00 – 11:00 PM – ISLE OF JAWS
11:00 – 11:30 PM – SHARK AFTER DARK

Monday, June 27

7:00 – 8:00 PM – ISLE OF JAWS
8:00 – 9:00 PM – SHALLOW WATER INVASION
9:00 – 10:00 PM – JAWS OF THE DEEP
10:00 – 11:00 PM – SHARKS AMONG US
11:00 – 11:30 PM – SHARK AFTER DARK

Tuesday, June 28

8:00 – 9:00 PM – JAWS OF THE DEEP
9:00 – 10:00 PM – WRATH OF A GREAT WHITE SERIAL KILLER
10:00 – 11:00 PM – AIR JAWS: NIGHT STALKER
11:00 – 11:30 PM – SHARK AFTER DARK

Wednesday, June 29

8:00 – 9:00 PM – WRATH OF THE GREAT WHITE SERIAL KILLER
9:00 – 10:00 PM – DEADLIEST SHARK
10:00 – 11:00 PM – SHARKS VS. DOLPHINS: FACE OFF
11:00 – 11:30 PM – SHARK AFTER DARK

Thursday, June 30

8:00 – 9:00 PM – TIGER BEACH
9:00 – 10:00 PM – NUCLEAR SHARKS
10:00 ­- 11:00 PM – JUNGLE SHARKS
11:00 – 11:30 PM – SHARK AFTER DARK

Friday, July 1

8:00 – 9:00 PM – DEADLIEST SHARKS
9:00 – 10:00 PM – SHARK BAIT
10:00 – 11:00 PM – BLUE SERENGETI

Saturday, July 2

8:00 – 9:00 PM – JUNGLE SHARK
9:00 – 10:00 PM – SHARKSANITY 3
10:00 – 11:00 pm – SHALLOW WATER INVASION

Sunday, July 3

8:00 – 9:00 PM – RETURN OF THE MONSTER MAKO
9:00 – 10:00 PM – THE KILLING GAMES

*Remember, there is nothing more American than discourse. You are always welcome to post your comments, thoughts, and questions below. Feedback is always appreciated!

Copyright ©2016 – The Systems Scientist

Top 10 Paying Bachelor’s Degrees

“It is engineers who helped to develop and build cars and trucks, mobile devices, laptops, and tablets, roads, bridges, and…”

By Matt Johnson, The Systems Scientist

Modern civilization is built on the mathematical and scientific achievements and advancements of the previous 350 years and the thousands of scientists and mathematicians who helped to develop and formulate such ideas that helped this modern civilization to emerge. It is one of the main reasons why practitioners in STEM fields are in high demand and will continue to be in high demand.

It is engineers of all shades who utilize mathematical and scientific ideas to develop technology. It is engineers who help develop and build cars and trucks, mobile devices, laptops, and tablets, roads, bridges, and tunnels, skyscrapers, ships, submarines, electronic equipment, space shuttles, satellites, giant telescopes, search engines, telecommunications, and so and so forth.

It’s easy to see why the top 1o paying bachelor’s degrees would be engineering degrees. Each of these engineering fields provides something to the products and services United States citizens benefit from everyday.

Did you watch the NBA Finals? Engineers. Did you successfully drive over a bridge on your way home from work in your car or truck? Engineers. Did you have to fill up your gas tank during your family road trip? Engineers. Did you watch Keeping Up with the Kardashians last night? Engineers. Well, it’s not perfect. But you get the point.

With that said, here are the top 10 paying Bachelor’s degrees for 2015/2016.

Data compiled by The Systems Scientist – Top 10 Degrees by Bachelor’s degree
Rank Major Degree Type Early Career Pay
1 Petroleum Engineering Bachelor’s $101,000
2 Mining Engineering Bachelor’s $71,500
3 Chemical Engineering Bachelor’s $69,500
4 Computer Science Bachelor’s $69,100
5 Computer Engineering Bachelor’s $68,400
6 Nuclear Engineering Bachelor’s $68,200
7 Systems Engineering Bachelor’s $67,100
8 Electrical & Computer Engineering Bachelor’s $67,000
9 Electrical Engineering Bachelor’s $66,500
10 Aeronautical Engineering Bachelor’s $65,100
Source: www.payscale.com

 

*Remember, there is nothing more American than discourse. You are always welcome to post your comments, thoughts, and questions below. Feedback is always appreciated!

 

 

 

Copyright ©2016 – The Systems Scientist